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Sometimes familiarity is good, a favourite song, a much-loved holiday destination, a favourite restaurant or a certain type of wine you find yourself coming back to time and time again! 

Sometimes though it’s good to leave familiarity behind, especially if it is holding back the business opportunities that we know we can achieve if we embrace change and look towards the future.

As Product Manager for the pioneering Hybrid Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) air conditioning technology from Mitsubishi Electric, I’ve come to look on change and evolution as part of my day-to-day working life.

And I’d like to share with you some ideas on what this change in technology can mean for you – and your business.

As a VRF specialist, you’ll know all about the changes coming down the line that will affect the type of refrigerants we as a manufacturer and you as an engineer can use.

It doesn’t use refrigerant in occupied spaces – it uses water instead but still delivers simultaneous heating and cooling

Mark Grayston Mark Grayston Mark Grayston is Product Manager for Mitsubishi Electric’s advanced range of VRF and Hybrid VRF air conditioning systems

It’s all to do with the Global Warming Potential (GWP) of the refrigerant and its carbon equivalent.  

What this means in the immediate future is that installing VRF into buildings such as hotels is likely to now include the need for leak detection equipment. 

Not only does this add to the complexity and time needed on the job, it will add significantly to your quote – not to mention adding to the ongoing maintenance for the customer as they recalibrate each individual detector each year!

And this is one of the significant benefits for the Hybrid VRF approach. 

Mitsubishi Electric Hybrid VRF: An Application Animation A short animated video showing exactly how Hybrid VRF works.

No need for leak detection in occupied spaces

That’s because it doesn’t use refrigerant in occupied spaces – it uses water instead but still delivers simultaneous heating and cooling – just like the VRF systems you already install.

And it’s not just the elimination of leak detection that’s good news for budgets and building schedules: with no ductwork required and only one outdoor condensing unit which can connect effortlessly to a number of indoor handling units, installation costs are vastly reduced too, when compared to VRF + leak detection.

What the system also does well is provide a high quality, robust heating and cooling solution, whilst taking up less valuable indoor room space.

It’s a whole new, fresh approach that really does have a whole range of refreshing benefits.

So the next time you have to quote for a VRF system and someone mentions British Standard EN378 and leak detection, you know exactly what to say and where to come.

Take the lead, embrace the change. 

Hybrid VRF CPD Guide

Mitsubishi Electric Guide to the Future of Air Conditioning - Hybrid Technologies

 

Mark Grayston is Product Manager for Mitsubishi Electric’s advanced range of VRF and Hybrid VRF air conditioning systems.  

If you have any questions about this article or want to know more, please email us. We will contact the author and will get back to you as soon as we can. 

If you would like more information on these topics and Hybrid VRF please visit https://hybridvrf.co.uk